CLUMBER PARK MAP PDF

A National Trust property, Clumber Park is open daily all year. This wide expanse of parkland, farmland and woods covers over acres hectares was once the seat of the Dukes of Newcastle. There are over different types of tree at this wonderful National Trust property, offering year-round colour and including the memorable avenue of limes, 2 miles 3km long, which forms the main approach. Particularly fascinating are the superb 19th-century glasshouses, which incorporate a palm house, vineries and working apiary, and overlook the walled kitchen garden.

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The route is fairly flat with no stiles or gates. There are a couple of short flights of steps and some of the paths can get a little muddy and uneven but generally the ground is very good, so the route would be suitable for a rugged pushchair. The park is generally open during daylight hours but check on the National Trust website before you visit. Dogs are welcome in Clumber Park.

The park gets very busy during summer weekends and bank holidays so if you want some peace then it would be best to avoid these times. There is a cafe and toilets at the start of the walk, and more toilets half way round. Approximate time 2 hours. Start to Lakeside The walk starts within the courtyard surrounded by the visitor centre and shop in the centre of Clumber Park.

With your back to the shop, walk downhill through the courtyard and pass through the gate in the bottom left-hand corner signed to the Chapel and Lake. Continue through the next courtyard, exiting through the gap in the hedge at the bottom.

Ahead you will see the lake. Keep left on the paved path with the lake to your right and passing the bay window of the cafe to the left. Follow the stone path between planted borders to reach the cathedral. Take some time to enjoy the view of the chapel. Clumber Chapel was commissioned in by the 7th Duke of Newcastle and was completed in The chapel has a ft spire, is Grade I listed and is often referred to as the Cathedral in Miniature.

Keep straight ahead through the planted borders of rhododendrons and pine trees and then bear right to join the path heading directly for the lake edge.

You will reach a T-junction with the lake in front of you and a Grecian Folly on the opposite banks. Clumber Lake is a serpentine lake covering 87 acres. It was created in by creating a dam across the River Poulter.

Follow this path as it winds between rhododendrons and then down some steps between a pair of curved stone benches with carved lions each end. Keep ahead down some more sets of steps and you will come to some railings ahead. This water inlet marks the position of the old boathouse which was part of the estate.

This once housed the impressive boats kept by the Duke of Newcastle, including a one-third scale naval frigate called The Lincoln. Turn right here and then keep right again to follow the path between tall planted borders. A short distance later you will pass out of the Pleasure Gardens via the ornate stone gateway. Keep ahead along a short fenced track.

Across to the left you will have great views of the glasshouse which forms part of the Walled Kitchen Garden. This is the longest stretch of glasshouse cared for by the National Trust and well worth a visit after your walk if you have time entrance fees apply. As you approach the pair of stone pillars ahead, fork right in front of them to join the path running to the right of woodland. Follow this stone and dirt track which soon enters the edge of the woodland with the lake to your right.

Continue on the path as it keeps swinging round to the left. Keep right into the stone car park marked with a sign for Lakeside Parking. Keep ahead alongside the wooden low vehicle barrier to join the lakeside path again. Follow this path enjoying the variety of birdlife visible across the lake.

This is now a haven for wetland birds. Keep ahead on the raised embankment, as you reach the woodland ahead keep right at the fork on the path closest to the lake. Follow the woodland path on this quieter side of the lake and you will come to the Grecian Folly on the left. From this point you can pause to enjoy the views back across the lake to the chapel and courtyard buildings.

Clumber Park comprises 3, acres of parkland and gardens. It was formed in when Queen Anne granted a licence to the first Duke of Newcastle to create a hunting area, known as Clumber Park, by enclosing 3, acres of Sherwood Forest.

A mansion, Clumber House, was built in and the creation of the parkland and lake followed. The mansion was demolished in , but the National Trust acquired the park in and has preserved the rest of the estate. The bridge, Clumber Bridge, was designed in and built from limestone to give views the house.

Ignore the woodland footpath off to the right this is a shortcut back to the start should you wish to take it. Instead keep ahead for a few paces and then fork left down the smaller tarmac road heading for a vehicle barrier. Just before you reach the barrier, turn left down a quiet tarmac lane marked as Access Only. At the end of the lane, pass out alongside another vehicle barrier to reach a T-junction with the minor road of Limetree Avenue.

Turn right onto the wide grass verge running to the right of the avenue. Here you will be walking between the two rows of lime trees, just one short section of the famous avenue. Limetree Avenue was planted by the 4th Duke of Newcastle in At more than 2 miles long it is the longest avenue of double lime trees in Europe.

Eventually you will reach a side road turning sharp right off the avenue. Turn sharp right to join this side road and pass alongside the vehicle barrier. A few paces later keep left at the fork onto a small tarmac lane heading back into the heart of the park.

A few hundred yards on, and before you reach the crossroads ahead, look out on the left for a long straight path which passes between a fenced grazing area on the left and an open grass additional parking area on the right. Take this path and follow it through the dip and then climbing steadily. Ignore the stile to the left. In the fenced area to the left you may see Longhorn Cattle and Jacob Sheep which are using for the conservation grazing project. You will emerge out across a grassy area another additional parking area to reach a tarmac lane.

Turn right alongside the tarmac lane and keep ahead at the next junction to reach the visitor centre where the walk began. The park is about 4. There are brown tourism signs to guide you to the entrances.

Once within the park follow signs for Visitor Information to park near the visitor centre. Approximate post code S80 3AZ.

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Directions

The route is fairly flat with no stiles or gates. There are a couple of short flights of steps and some of the paths can get a little muddy and uneven but generally the ground is very good, so the route would be suitable for a rugged pushchair. The park is generally open during daylight hours but check on the National Trust website before you visit. Dogs are welcome in Clumber Park. The park gets very busy during summer weekends and bank holidays so if you want some peace then it would be best to avoid these times. There is a cafe and toilets at the start of the walk, and more toilets half way round.

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Clumber Park

History[ edit ] Clumber Park in Clumber, mentioned in the Domesday Book was a monastic property in the Middle Ages, but later came into the hands of the Holles family. Clumber house, close to the River Poulter at the centre of the park, became a hunting lodge. Two generations later, the heir to the estate, Lord Lincoln , decided to make it one of his principal mansions. From onwards, work on the house and park proceeded, under the supervision of a carpenter and builder named Fuller White although he is likely to have been working to plans from architect Stephen Wright. White was dismissed in , and Wright took charge of the project, replacing some of the s features in the s.

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