BLUE ZONE DAN BUETTNER PDF

It indicates a way to close an interaction, or dismiss a notification. Dan Buettner, a continent-trekking cyclist and storyteller, figured out that the world consisted of at least five "Blue Zones," in the early s. In this handful of hidden corners scattered across the globe, he discovered that people were sailing past the year mark with surprising frequency, and often avoiding dementia. People residing in these Blue Zones are outliving us because they have figured out what others have not, according to Buettner. They consistently eat a healthful diet, and they also move around about every 20 minutes or so during each day. But he says it took him years after that initial discovery to figure out exactly why the rest of us are getting the simple diet and exercise formula so wrong.

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He approved of coffee. As we walked through Greenwich Village, looking for a decent shot of joe to fuel an afternoon of shopping and cooking and talking about the enigma of longevity, he pointed out that the men and women of Icaria, a Greek island in the middle of the Aegean Sea, regularly slurp down two or three muddy cups a day.

This came as delightful news to me. Icaria has a key role in Mr. In Icaria they stand a decent chance of living to see The purpose of our rendezvous was to see whether the insights of a longevity specialist like Mr.

Buettner could be applied to the life of a food-obsessed writer in New York, a man whose occupational hazards happen to include chicken wings, cheeseburgers, martinis and marathon tasting menus. And the recent deaths even if accidental of men in my exact demographic — the food writer Joshua Ozersky, the tech entrepreneur Dave Goldberg — had put me in a mortality-anxious frame of mind. With my own half-century mark eerily visible on the horizon, could Mr.

Buettner, who has spent the last 10 years unlocking the mysteries of longevity, offer me a midcourse correction? To that end, he had decided to cook me something of a longevity feast.

Visiting from his home in Minnesota and camped out at the townhouse of his friends Andrew Solomon and John Habich in the Village, this trim, tanned, year-old guru of the golden years was geared up to show me that living a long time was not about subsisting on a thin gruel of, well, gruel. After that blast of coffee, which I dutifully diluted with soy milk as instructed at O Cafe on Avenue of the Americas, Mr.

Buettner and I set forth on our quest at the aptly named LifeThyme market, where signs in the window trumpeted the wonders of wheatgrass. He reassured me, again, by letting me know that penitent hedge clippings had no place in our Blue Zones repast. Instead, as he ambled through the market dropping herbs and vegetables into his basket, he insisted that our life-extending banquet would hinge on normal affordable items that almost anyone can pick up at the grocery store.

He grabbed fennel and broccoli, celery and carrots, tofu and coconut milk, a bag of frozen berries and a can of chickpeas and a jar of local honey. Buettner has developed a matter-of-fact disregard for gastro-trends of all stripes.

At LifeThyme, he passed by refrigerated shelves full of vogue-ish juices in hues of green, orange and purple. Eat the fruit. Or eat the vegetable. So far, I was feeling pretty good about my chances of making it to I figured that pretty soon Mr. Buettner would throw me a dietary curveball I noticed with vague concern that he was not putting any meat or cheese into his basket , but by this point I was already thinking about how fun it would be to meet my great-grandchildren.

Image Mr. Buettner at LifeThyme Market. Buettner told me. It turns out that walking is a popular mode of transport in the Blue Zones, too — particularly on the sun-splattered slopes of Sardinia, Italy, where many of those who make it to are shepherds who devote the bulk of each day to wandering the hills and treating themselves to sips of red wine.

Red wine and long walks? Buettner moves his muscles a lot more than I do. He likes to go everywhere on that fold-up bike, which he hauls along with him on trips, and sometimes he does yoga and goes in-line skating. But he generally believes that the high-impact exercise mania as practiced in the major cities of the United States winds up doing as much harm as good.

We walked from the market to the townhouse. And it was here, as Mr. Buettner laid out his cooking ingredients on a table in Mr. Where was the butter? Buettner later wrote in an email. Where was the meat? Where was the cheese? No cheese? Buettner had leapt to the conclusion that I had probably had enough meat and cheese for the week already.

He was correct. You ask her. Ask her if Icarian stew has any role in her love for me. Buettner is dating Ms. Freston, the author and advocate of veganism who used to be married to Tom Freston, the former MTV executive. Raised in Minnesota, Mr. Not long ago he dropped by the Mayo Clinic to meet a doctor for an executive physical.

Buettner said. During our afternoon and evening together, he joked that the paleo diet is fine if all you want is the life expectancy of a cave man. The raw food movement? Buettner brushed it aside and pointed out that in all of the Blue Zones, people cook their meals, sometimes for hours. Fear of a wheat planet? After a couple of hours in the kitchen, Mr. Buettner defied the carb-avoiders and gluten-dodgers of America by dashing over to Union Square on foot to score several loaves of long-fermented, freshly baked sourdough at Breads Bakery.

We were back to the good news. After a bunch of his friends had gathered in the kitchen Mr. Among them were Mr. There came a broccoli soup thickened with cashew cream; a simple Japanese paste made from mixing sweet potato and coconut milk; a honey-touched tofu parfait crowned with a berry compote, which Mr. I guess Mr. Buettner has never had the gochujang Buffalo wings at Seoul Chicken. Solomon, although enthusiastic about the longevity feast, appeared to be reading my mind. The meal itself was delicious and nourishing, even if there were moments when my restaurant-conditioned palate was crying out for salt.

In a sense, though, the meal was almost beside the point, blurring as it went on into waves of wine and conviviality. Along the way, Mr. Buettner stage-whispered into Mr. And as each course arrived the Icarian stew claiming its rich, flavor-deep place as an obvious showstopper , Mr. Solomon asked.

Buettner replied.

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History of Blue Zones

He approved of coffee. As we walked through Greenwich Village, looking for a decent shot of joe to fuel an afternoon of shopping and cooking and talking about the enigma of longevity, he pointed out that the men and women of Icaria, a Greek island in the middle of the Aegean Sea, regularly slurp down two or three muddy cups a day. This came as delightful news to me. Icaria has a key role in Mr. In Icaria they stand a decent chance of living to see The purpose of our rendezvous was to see whether the insights of a longevity specialist like Mr.

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Dan Buettner

Emmy-winning Filmmaker Dan Buettner on Blue Zones The bestselling author explores places around the world where people live longer and better by Dan Buettner, AARP , December 10, Comments: 0 Edward Linsmier How did you discover the "blue zones," the places around the world where people are most likely to live to be ? As a National Geographic fellow, I came across a report showing that the people who lived in Okinawa had the longest disability-free life expectancy in the world. We organized an expedition to find out why, and then went to the National Institute on Aging for funding to look for other blue zones. In the first wave of research, we identified two more: Sardinia and a Seventh-day Adventist community in Loma Linda, California. What makes a blue zone? These places have the lowest rate of middle-age mortality or the highest concentration of centenarians on their continent.

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