ALLANBLACKIA FLORIBUNDA PDF

Introduction[ edit ] The volumes of Allanblackia seeds, and hence seed oil, produced until now very low. The volume of allanblackia seed oil is in the range of metric tonnes per annum only. When initial studies on the potential of wild-harvesting were done in the early s, the expectations were very high predicting annual production of up to 40, tonnes of seeds. In reality only a few tonnes of seeds were harvested in the first year as the number of wild Allanblackia trees that could actually be harvested had severely been overestimated.

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Abstract The consumption and commercial exploitation of Allanblackia Clusiaceae seed oils is of current interest. The favorable physicochemical characteristics of Allanblackia oil solid at room temperature; high stearic acid content lend food products that contain it i.

Such considerations are important for individuals prone to cardiovascular disease or with hypercholesterolemia. Domestication projects of several Allanblackia species in tropical Africa are underway, but wildcrafting of fruits to meet the seed demand still occurs. Proper species authentication is important, since only authenticated oil can be deemed safe for human consumption. The chemical constituency of Allanblackia seed oils, and potential roles of these phytochemicals in preventive strategies e.

The primary and secondary metabolite constituency of the seed oils of nearly all Allanblackia species is still poorly known. The presence, identity, and quantity of potentially bioactive secondary metabolites in the seed oils, and pharmacological testing of isolated compounds were identified as important directions for future research. Keywords: Allanblackia, Clusiaceae, oil, seed, functional food, saturated fatty acid, stearic acid, oleic acid 1.

During recent decades, as information about the negative health effects of animal fat consumption has accumulated, higher consumption rates of fats and oils from plants have been documented. In addition, the demand for oils and fats from alternative plant sources has steadily increased, driven by several factors including: the demand for food from a steadily growing population with more financial resources, demand for biodiesel food-fuel debate , price increase of some oils due to the rising costs of agricultural production, storage, and transport, fluctuations in oilseed yield due to poor climatic conditions in many parts of the world, and speculation [ 1 ].

At the same time, an ever increasing number of consumers believe that foods contribute directly to their health and this has, in turn, driven food producers and manufacturers to produce foods that not only satisfy hunger and provide valuable nutrients, but can be used as preventative medicine to improve both physical and mental health [ 3 ].

The World Health Organization WHO and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations FAO have described diets and lifestyle habits that can contribute to the development of such chronic diseases as cancer, osteoporosis, coronary heart disease, obesity, periodontal disease, and type 2 diabetes [ 4 ].

Therefore, changes in diet and potentially the inclusion of functional foods could lead to the prevention of chronic diseases. As a growing market, functional foods have steadily increasing economic importance. With regard to plant-based oils as functional foods, information on both the primary i.

While numerous reviews about bioactive components in the common commodity oils are available, the literature describing primary and secondary constituents in new, alternative, edible plant-based oils is still sparse.

Additionally, few studies have specifically focused on the roles of these phytochemicals in preventive strategies e. The current review summarizes information known about the oils expressed from seeds of species of Allanblackia Oliv. Bentham Clusiaceae , a genus that is currently the focus of a high degree of attention with regard to its consumption and commercial exploitation.

Results and Discussion 2. The family comprises the subfamilies Clusieae Choisy Clusia L. Species belonging to the Garcinieae are dioecious and share several morphological characters including the possession of colleters clusters of mucilaginous secretory hairs , capitate stigmas, frequently non-scaly buds and anthers that open toward the gynoecium, as well as fruits that are indehiscent and baccate, whereby the testa and endocarp are at least partially fused [ 5 ].

Sweeney [ 6 ] and Ruhfel et al. Nine species of Allanblackia have been recognized, all of which are restricted in their natural distribution to tropical Africa, according to Bamps et al. Bamps, A. Chevalier, A. Three of these species A.

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Allanblackia oil

Abstract The consumption and commercial exploitation of Allanblackia Clusiaceae seed oils is of current interest. The favorable physicochemical characteristics of Allanblackia oil solid at room temperature; high stearic acid content lend food products that contain it i. Such considerations are important for individuals prone to cardiovascular disease or with hypercholesterolemia. Domestication projects of several Allanblackia species in tropical Africa are underway, but wildcrafting of fruits to meet the seed demand still occurs.

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Allanblackia floribunda

The medium-sized tree up to 30 meters tall is evergreen and dioecious male and female flowers on different plants. The wood is said to be resistant to termites but is not particularly durable. In Ghana small trees are cut for poles and find use as mine pit-props and bridge-piles. The twigs are used in Ghana as candlesticks, and the smaller ones as chew-sticks and tooth-picks in Ghana and Gabon.

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